Home
Videos uploaded by user “The Virtual Linguistics Campus”
PSY101 - Psycholinguistics - An Overview
 
10:03
The hybrid name psycholinguistics reflects a truly interdisciplinary endeavour: Linguists are engaged in the formal description of language, psycholinguists attempt to discover how the underlying structures are used in the processes of speaking, understanding and remembering, and how they are acquired by children. This clip serves as an introdction to the VLC psycholinguistics class and discusses the main goals of the field.
Reading Spectrograms: Vowels
 
04:00
How can vowels be classified acoustically and how can we identify vowels within complex spectrograms? Within the first two minutes Prof. Handke discusses how formant patterns allow us to identify vowels, in the second part of this short micro-lecture he analyses two complex spectrograms focusing on the vowels within them.
Reading Spectrograms: Consonants
 
04:01
How can consonants be classified acoustically, what are their characteristic spectral properties and how can we identify them within complex spectrigrams? Within the first part of this 3-minute micro-lecture Prof. Handke discusses the central acoustic properties of consonants, in the second part he analyses a complex spectrogram focusing on the consonants within it.
GEN102 - What is Linguistics (not)?
 
07:26
On 1 August 2014, the VLC started two more MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) with almost a thousand participants from all over the world. Some of them might be totally unaware of what linguistics could be. Here is a brief answer: A video about what linguistics is, and, what it is not.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Assimilation
 
02:05
What is assimilation and how can we classify different types of it? These questions are in the center of this less-than-two-minute micro-lecture by Prof. Handke.
HIS102 - The OE Period
 
21:09
This E-Lecture discusses the period of Old English with its main phases: from the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons, via the constant invasions of the Vikings up to a detailed account of what happend in 1066. Thus, the E-Lecture is more or less socio-culturally oriented, rather than linguistic. It is meant as a general overview of the most important facts and figures of the Old English era.
GEN102 - 5 Reasons for Linguistics with David Crystal
 
08:52
Why shall we bother about linguistics? What are the main reasons for doing linguistics? In an interview recorded at Marburg university during the 2nd GAL Conference, Prof. Handke asked Prof. David Crystal, the most popular linguist in the world, to give us his 5 central reasons for doing linguistics.
HIS110 - The History of English - An Overview
 
13:56
In this short E-Lecture, which addresses undergraduate students of English and linguistics, Prof. Handke provides an overview of the most important cultural and linguistic aspects that affected the development of the English language through time. This includes examples spoken in original pronunciation of each period.
PHY117 - The Great Vowel Shift
 
19:28
This E-Lecture discusses the central principles and stages of the Great Vowel Shift, the chain shift that has influenced the English language until the present day. Using the potential of the ActivBoard, Jürgen Handke, discusses each individual stage of the GVS in detail, produces examples where necessary and includes phonological and more general explanations for this influential sound shift.
PHO103 - Speech Anatomy
 
12:05
This E-Lecture discusses the three central mechanisms of speech production: respiration, phonation and articulation.
HIS103 - The ME Period
 
14:09
This E-Lecture discusses the period of Middle English (1100 to 1500) with its main phases: from its decline after the Norman conquest to its re-birth in the 13th and its eventual triumph in the 15th century. Thus, the E-Lecture is not only linguistically oriented but it includes the main socio-cultural events as well as the main literary achievements of that time. It is meant as a general overview of the most important facts and figures of the Middle English era.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Secondary Articulation
 
02:05
Within just 2 minutes Prof. Handke explains and exemplifies the central types of secondary articulation, and, furthermore, distinguishes secondary from co-articulation.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Lexemes
 
01:47
What are lexemes and how are they related to actual word-forms? In just over a minute, Prof. Handke explains the structure and the use of lexemes and defines terms such as paradigm and word-family. (Optional Spanish subtitles by Andrea Yaques, Lima, Peru)
Data Analysis - Morphological Trees, VLC Series #1
 
04:32
In this combination of a screencast and an E-Lecture Prof. Handke explains how derivatives cam be analyzed and described morpholically using the compositional syntactic approach using the percolation conventions introduced by Liz Selkirk in the mid-1980s.
Syntax - The Formal Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #1)
 
04:35
In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the formal analysis of a sentences: First, in terms of its simple and phrasal categories and then by looking at the clausal structure.
SYN1957 - Syntactic Structures (N. Chomsky)
 
02:03
Within less than two minutes Prof. Handke and his team discuss and illustrate the content of this major contribution to the field of linguistics. The videos of this series are supplementary to the E-Lectures and the Virtual Sessions that constitute the respective E-Learning unit on the Virtual Linguistics Campus (www.linguistics-online.com).
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Allomorphs
 
01:43
What are allomorphs? Within less than two minutes Prof. Handke explains this important morphological notion using the plural morpheme of PDE.
PHO105 - Phonation
 
13:56
This E-Lecture first outlines the structure and the function of the larynx and the central ingredients of the aerodynmic-myoelastic model of phonation.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Ablaut
 
01:34
What is "Ablaut"? Within just over a minute Prof. Handke defines and exemplifies this specific type of sound change using examples from English and German.
SYN104 - Generative Grammar
 
11:23
This E-Lecture discusses the fundamental ideas of generative grammar, the most influential grammar model in linguistic theory. In particular we exemplfy the main principles that account for the non-finite character of natural language as well as the phenonemon of native speaker competence. As a result the main architecture of generative grammar is defined.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Free Variation
 
01:44
In this Micro-Lecture of less than two minutes Prof. Handke discusses the phenomenon of free variation, where different allophones of a phoneme which occur in the same environment do not cause a change in meaning. Recorded at FH Krems, Austria during a video workshop.
SEM143 - Deixis
 
15:06
This E-Lecture discusses the various aspects of deixis (Greek for "pointing with words"), ranging from person to discourse deixis. As usual, Prof. Handke uses a variety of examples to illustrate his main points.
Reading Spectrograms: Words I
 
02:05
In this short micro-lecture, Prof. Handke analyzes a spectrogram of a single word and explains how we can identify its sound segments on the basis of their acoustic properties (Slide Download: http://bit.ly/1LM8F2l)
GEN120 - Universal Grammar - Part I
 
08:30
What is Universal Grammar and what are the central linguistic arguments underlying this influential model of linguistic thought? Prof. Handke seeks to answer these questions using linguistic and non-linguistic examples, but he also discusses the main problems that the current version of UG has to face.
SEM141 - Speech Acts - An Overview
 
14:28
This E-Lecture is the first part of the VLC introduction to pragmatics. It discusses the central differences between meaning and use and examines the use of utterances with special emphasis on speech act theory.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Adjuncts
 
01:59
What are adjuncts, how can we define them according to a traditional view and how are they defined in X'-syntax? Within less than two minutes Prof. Handke explains the central aspects associated with the term adjunct. (Optional Spanish subtitles by Andrea Yaques, Lima, Peru)
GEN102 - Language and Linguistics
 
14:09
This E-Lecture is the first of the series "Introduction to Linguistics". It discusses the central terms "language" and "linguistics", provides an overview of the field of linguistics with its main branches, and lists several arguments that should motivate you to deal with linguistics.
SYN1965 - Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (N. Chomsky)
 
01:53
Within less than two minutes Prof. Handke and his team discuss and illustrate the content of this major contribution to the field of linguistics. The videos of this series are supplementary to the E-Lectures and the Virtual Sessions that constitute the respective E-Learning unit on the Virtual Linguistics Campus (www.linguistics-online.com).
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Nasalization
 
01:39
What is nasalization? Within less than two minutes Prof. Handke explains this phonetic phenomenon, draws a distinction between nasalization and nasal articulation and includes two contrasting pairs from Polish.
PHO104 - Airstream Mechanisms
 
14:06
This E-Lecture discusses the airstream mechanisms used in speech production: pulmonic, glottalic and velaric including the articulation of the resulting non-pulmonic speech sounds.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Ergatives
 
01:59
What are ergative constructions, how are they realized in PDE and how can they be distinguished from standard sentences? These questions constitute the focus of Prof. Handke's less-than-two-minute explanation.
PHO107 - Basic Segments of Speech (Vowels I)
 
16:30
The focus of this most popular VLC-E-Lecture is the system of Cardinal Vowels. Jürgen Handke not only discusses the phonetic description of vowel articulation, he also shows how the Cardinal Vowel Chart can be developed and constructed - and last but not least: he produces the Primary and Secondary set of Cardinal Vowels. This includes snapshots of the tongue position in each case and a real-time anterior view for each vowel. The follow-up E-Lecture Vowels II discusses the use of the cardinal vowels as reference vowels for the types of vowels that exist in the languages of the world.
PHO101 - The Speech Chain
 
07:39
This short introductory E-Lecture to classes such as Phonetics, or the Nature of Speech, provides an overview of the central branches of phonetics and their main goals.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Archiphonemes
 
02:05
What is an archiphoneme, how is it represented and what is the fundamental concept behind it? Within just two minutes, Prof. Handke discusses and exemplifies this important phonological concept that was introduced by the Prague School of Phonologists in the 1920s.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Morphs and Morphemes
 
01:41
How do we get from morphs to morphemes? Within less than two minutes, Prof. Handke explains the main principles of morphological analysis and defines terms such as morph, allomorph and morpheme. (Optional Spanish subtitles by Andrea Yaques, Lima, Peru)
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: The Syllable
 
01:55
What is a syllable and how can it be represented? Within less than two minutes Prof. Handke discusses this basic phonological concept and provides several examples from PDE.
Final Devoicing - Remedial Strategies for German EFL Learners
 
02:47
Can you pronounce the difference between "dog" and "dock" well enough? If this is so, you have no trouble with the phenomenon of final devoicing. But if you encounter problems in pronouncing PDE words like "bid" or "dog", then this micro-lecture, where Prof. Handke suggests some strategies to overcome this typical German problem, is just right for you.
GEN141 - Modern Writing Systems
 
09:44
In the second E-lecture of this short series, Prof. Handke discusses the modern writing systems and exemplifies the main variants of logographic and phonographic systems. This includes a short discussion about the pros and cons of the central variants, abstract logographic vs. alphabetic.
Linguistic Video Scribes - Constituent Analysis: The IP
 
02:14
This video scribe where Prof. Handke outlines the main structure of the sentence, now referred to as IP, is supplementary to the e-lecture "More on Constituents II" where the principles of organizing the sentential constituents according to the X-bar Syntax scheme are discussed and exemplified.
PHO120 - Sound Waves
 
12:27
The study of the acoustic properties of speech requires knowledge in gerenal acoustics, that is about sound waves. This E-Lecture provides this background knowledge in discussing aspects such as simple and complex sound waves, the phenomenon of resonance including the production and analysis of harmonics and formants.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Umlaut
 
01:24
When thinking about the term "Umlaut", many Germans have the letters ä, ö, and ü in their minds. However, as explained by Prof. Handke within just over a minute, umlaut is a type of sound change that merges two vowels within a word.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Categorical Perception
 
02:11
What is categorical perception and why is it such an important phenomenon of speech perception? These questions are in the center of this two-minute micro-lecture by Prof. Handke where he also introduces some selected acoustic cues.
PHO101 - Phonetics (Overview)
 
11:25
This introductory E-Lecture (on the VLC it is used in Unit 2 of the "Introduction to Linguistics Class") provides an overview of phonetics with a focus on articulatory phonetics using examples where possible.
PHO121 - Speech Analysis
 
19:02
This E-Lecture first discusses the central methods of sound analysis and then shows how spectrograms are produced and analyzed. This includes a discussion of the formant frequencies of vowels, the acoustic characteristics of consonants and the construction of an acoustic vowel chart.
MOR112 - Compounding
 
06:46
Compounding (also referred to as composition) is a word-formation process that involves at least two base forms (lexemes). This E-Lecture by Prof. Dr. Birte Bös and Prof. Dr. Jürgen Handke introduces the basic ways of classifying compounds semantically and discusses the options of spelling compounds. 0:46 Classification 1:30 Left-Headedness 2:21 Endocentric Compounds 2:48 Exocentric Compounds 4:03 Building Compounds 4:32 The Spelling of Compounds
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Sonority
 
01:50
What is sonority and how can speech sounds be defined in terms of this major-class feature? These questions are in the center of this less-than-two-minute micro-lecture by Prof. Handke.
Reading Spectrograms: Words II
 
02:25
In this short micro-lecture, Prof. Handke analyzes a spectrogram of a single word and explains how we can identify its sound segments on the basis of their acoustic properties. Download Iink for slides: http://bit.ly/1CVD726
SOC101 - Language, Dialect, Variety
 
12:31
This video discusses the different approaches towards language, dialect, and variety. It provides several criteria of language definition as well as numerous problems involved.
Linguistic Micro-Lectures: Co-Articulation
 
01:59
What is Co-Articulation? Within less than two minutes Prof. Handke explains and exemplifies several examples of co-articulation including examples from West-African languages.
MOR112 - Compounding
 
14:52
Compounding (also referred to as composition) is a word-formation process that involves at least two base forms (lexemes). This unit introduces the basic techniques of classifying compounds semantically as well as the options for defining compounds according to their combinatory possibilities.