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Videos uploaded by user “PaulHD”
Arksun - Remember The Night
 
02:49
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel Composed by JJwilson (https://soundcloud.com/user-415243767) Software: u-he Repro-5 Photography by Bella Kotak Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 1999 PaulHD
Enya - Caribbean Blue
 
03:05
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes. "The Ocean is a central image. It is the symbolism of a great journey." Enya
Views: 10613 PaulHD
Marc-André Hamelin - Etude No.4 "D'apres Alkan"
 
04:19
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Sigismond Thalberg, Friedrich Kalkbrenner and Franz Liszt once stated that Charles-Valentin Alkan had the most perfect technique he had ever seen! Source: Mostly Wikipedia Website Contributed by Aryeh Oron (March 2007)
Views: 7531 PaulHD
Enya - After Ventus
 
03:03
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes. "Imagination is the true magic carpet." Norman Vincent Peale
Views: 5579 PaulHD
Shawn Lane - Rules of the Game
 
03:56
In Memory of the Gentle Genius, Shawn Lane (1963-2003) May You Rest in Peace . . . "I am Here I am Alive I have given it all for this Moment This Eternity of Now is Mine Can You See What I See? Feel This! Know this Ecstasy of Music! Be with Me in this Place of Light and Total Bliss! Time Stops Here Time is no More Pain is Gone Sorrow is Meaningless I can run in this Place I can Fly I Stand on the Mountain Top My Body is of no Concern Here This is the Realm of the Soul and the Door to the Spirit Opens . . ." EER-MUSIC.com
Views: 1687 PaulHD
Jean-Amédée Méreaux - Étude Opus 63 No.24 "Bravura"
 
03:12
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Grand Piano
Views: 1758 PaulHD
Kyle Gann - No.6 "Bud Ran Back Out"
 
03:42
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Software: XLN Audio Addictive Keys Kyle Eugene Gann (born November 21, 1955) is an American professor of music, critic and composer born in Dallas, Texas, who has worked primarily in the New York City area. As a music critic for The Village Voice (from November 1986 to December 2005) and other publications, he has supported progressive music, including such Downtown movements as postminimalism and totalism. Gann's work as a composer can be classified generally into three categories: microtonal works in just intonation, involving electronics;[1][2] rhythmically complex works for Disklavier (computer-driven acoustic piano); and piano and ensemble music whose rhythmic complexity tends to be milder and within a single tempo framework.[citation needed] Most of his music has expressed the concept of repeating loops, ostinatos, or isorhythms of different lengths going out of phase with each other; the idea leads to simultaneous layers of different, mutually prime tempo relationships in his Disklavier and electronic works, and is used in a less obvious structural way in his live-ensemble music.[citation needed] This concept can be traced back to suggestions in the rhythmic chapter of Henry Cowell's book New Musical Resources. Gann has said that he has been inspired his studies of astrology, into which he was drawn by the writings of composer/astrologer Dane Rudhyar.[citation needed] Another thread in his work has been the influence, both rhythmic and melodic, of Native American music, particularly that of the Hopi, Zuni, and other Southwest Pueblo tribes. Gann first learned about this music from reading a musical analysis of a Zuni buffalo dance published in the book Sonic Design by Robert Cogan and Pozzi Escot. According to Gann, "It was going back and forth between different tempos: triplet, quarter, dotted quarter, and quarters. So I started collecting American Indian music. [It] solved a rhythmic problem for me, because I was really interested in music with different tempos."[3] Starting in 1984 with his political piece The Black Hills Belong to the Sioux, Gann adopted a method of switching between different tempos (usually between quarter-notes, dotted eighths, triplet quarters, and other values) as a more performable alternative to the simultaneous layers at contrasting tempos that he had sought earlier under the influence of Charles Ives.[citation needed] Other composers had arrived at a similar technique via other routes, coalescing into a New York style of the 1980s and '90s called Totalism. A common Gann strategy is to set a rhythmic process in motion and use harmony (mostly triadic or seventh-chord-based, whether microtonal or conventional) to inflect the form and focus the listener's attention. Gann's microtonal music proceeds according to Harry Partch's technique of tonality flux, linking chords through tiny (less than a half-step) increments of voice-leading. In 2000, Gann studied jazz harmony with John Esposito, and began using bebop harmony as a basis for his non-microtonal music, even in contexts not reminiscent of jazz.[citation needed] From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Views: 2062 PaulHD
Enya - Memory of Trees
 
03:14
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. “Do not fear your inner light. Carry your light to the dark world.” Lailah Gifty Akita
Views: 1159 PaulHD
Angelfire (Steve Morse & Sarah Spencer) - Take it or Leave it
 
04:01
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel https://www.instagram.com/sarahspencermusic/?hl=en www.stevemorse.com/ Buy Digital Edition: http://calliopia.org/catalog/angelfire-download-only/
Views: 973 PaulHD
Casey Sabol - Gravity
 
03:52
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel https://soundcloud.com/casey-sabol Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 1807 PaulHD
J.S. Bach - BWV 721 (Piano & Strings Transcription)
 
04:41
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Midi by Mike Magatagan Photography by Michael Woloszynowicz It was only for fifteen years, or the first third of his active professional life, that Johann Sebastian Bach served as a church organist. As such, he was mainly expected to accompany church congregations during hymn singing, and to provide them with musical support before the singing began. This involved outlining the melody, giving the key note, and setting the tempo and the mood, both musical and spiritual. When seated before his organ manuals, Bach the musician, believer, and poet instinctively paraphrased the religiously-charged hymn tunes, providing a sort of theological commentary in music. This was the chorale prelude. Bach inherited the basic musical form from Johann Pachelbel, enlarged on it in the style of Georg Boehm and Diderik Buxtehude, and raised it - as he was to do with so many other musical forms - to a peerless degree of development and perfection. No absolutely accurate count of these works can be made, but there are known to exist at least 200 chorale preludes to the hymns most frequently sung in the Lutheran churches of Thuringia. The Chorale "Erbarm’ dich mein, O Herre Gott" ("Lord God Have Mercy On Me") BWV 721 occupies a unique place in the canon of Bach organ chorales. The stately melody rises from a heavy, mournful bass line in a somewhat archaic style reminiscent of Johann Kuhnau. Bach was acquainted with the affable, highly cultivated Kuhnau, a lawyer as well as an organist and composer, and eventually succeeded him at Leipzig's St. Thomas church. The piece can thus be considered as both a musical tribute to Kuhnau’s art, and a prayer for the repose of his soul. This chorale is one of Bach's most strikingly simple arrangements: Within this simplicity, however, is profundity. The setting has the affekt of a mysterious, somber procession, evoking the plea for mercy of the text (in English): Have mercy, Lord, my sin forgive; For Thy long-suffering is great! O cleanse and make me fit to live, My sore offence do thou abate With shame do I my fault confess, 'Gainst Thee alone, Lord, have I sinned. Thou art the source of righteousness, And I the sinner just condemned. Source: http://harmonicclassics.com
Views: 979 PaulHD
Enya - Epona
 
01:52
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Grand Piano Painting: John William Waterhouse "The Lady of Shalott, 1888, after a põem by Tennyson.
Views: 1597 PaulHD
Enya - On My Way Home
 
03:55
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes
Views: 2576 PaulHD
Carl Czerny - The School Of Velocity Op. 299 No. 39
 
01:13
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Midi by CarlKoh (musescore.com) Photography: Antonovich Design Carl Czerny (1791-1857), who was a pupil of Beethoven and the teacher of Liszt, was one of the most sought-after piano teachers of his day and Beethoven regarded him highly enough to entrust his beloved nephew, Karl, to his pedagogy. Because Czerny was so prodigious in his understanding of the elements most important to the development of technical facility at the keyboard, his studies became standard during his lifetime, and he was very successful as a composer as well as a teacher. The School Of Velocity, Op.299, one of Czerny's great works, is a complete series of 40 piano studies which helps to improve technical skills of keyboard playing. One of his exhilarating studies I chosen, which is the 39th study of The School Of Velocity, Op.299. It is a study which emphasizes the playing of arpeggios.
Views: 153 PaulHD
Casey Sabol - Paradise
 
04:04
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel https://soundcloud.com/casey-sabol Photography by Bella Kotak Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 294 PaulHD
J.S. Bach - Partita in D minor BWV 1004 No. 02 "Gigue"
 
04:31
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Transcribed by Mike Magatagan (musescore.com) Artwork: Jean-François Rauzier The Partita in D minor for solo violin (BWV 1004) by Johann Sebastian Bach was written during 1717--1723. In the preface to his 1955 transcription, John Cook writes: "The Chaconne is sublimely satisfying in its original form, yet many will agree that a single violin is only able to hint at the vast implications of much of this music ... It is perhaps not unreasonable to suppose that Bach would have chosen the organ, had he transcribed the Chaconne himself, as the instrument best suited to the scale of his ideas ... A good performance on the violin may be taken as the best guide to interpretation on the organ — the two instruments are not without their points in common, and both were beloved of Bach." The earliest version for organ is by William Thomas Best. Further transcriptions are by John Cook, Wilhelm Middelschulte, Walter Henry Goss-Custard (1915--55), and Henri Messerer (1838--1923). Since Bach's time, several different transcriptions of the piece have been made for other instruments, particularly for the piano (by Ferruccio Busoni and Joachim Raff), and for the piano left-hand (by Brahms). Johannes Brahms, in a letter to Clara Schumann, said about the ciaccona: On one stave, for a small instrument, the man writes a whole world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings. If I imagined that I could have created, even conceived the piece, I am quite certain that the excess of excitement and earth-shattering experience would have driven me out of my mind. Felix Mendelssohn and Robert Schumann each wrote piano accompaniments for the work. Although this piece was originally written for Violin, I transcribed it for Solo Viola.
Views: 149 PaulHD
Enya - Flora's Secret
 
04:02
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Photography by Kirsty Mitchell
Views: 330 PaulHD
Tuukka Jokilehto - A Lost Silent Film (Excerpt)
 
01:31
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Tuukka Jokilehto = https://musescore.com/user/204621 Painting: Grainger Street, Newcastle upon Tyne by Louis H Grimshaw ,1902. From the Laing Art Gallery collection.
Views: 184 PaulHD
Kyle Gann - No.1 "Despotic Waltz"
 
02:20
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Grand Piano Kyle Eugene Gann (born November 21, 1955) is an American professor of music, critic and composer born in Dallas, Texas, who has worked primarily in the New York City area. As a music critic for The Village Voice (from November 1986 to December 2005) and other publications, he has supported progressive music, including such Downtown movements as postminimalism and totalism. Gann's work as a composer can be classified generally into three categories: microtonal works in just intonation, involving electronics;[1][2] rhythmically complex works for Disklavier (computer-driven acoustic piano); and piano and ensemble music whose rhythmic complexity tends to be milder and within a single tempo framework.[citation needed] Most of his music has expressed the concept of repeating loops, ostinatos, or isorhythms of different lengths going out of phase with each other; the idea leads to simultaneous layers of different, mutually prime tempo relationships in his Disklavier and electronic works, and is used in a less obvious structural way in his live-ensemble music.[citation needed] This concept can be traced back to suggestions in the rhythmic chapter of Henry Cowell's book New Musical Resources. Gann has said that he has been inspired his studies of astrology, into which he was drawn by the writings of composer/astrologer Dane Rudhyar.[citation needed] Another thread in his work has been the influence, both rhythmic and melodic, of Native American music, particularly that of the Hopi, Zuni, and other Southwest Pueblo tribes. Gann first learned about this music from reading a musical analysis of a Zuni buffalo dance published in the book Sonic Design by Robert Cogan and Pozzi Escot. According to Gann, "It was going back and forth between different tempos: triplet, quarter, dotted quarter, and quarters. So I started collecting American Indian music. [It] solved a rhythmic problem for me, because I was really interested in music with different tempos."[3] Starting in 1984 with his political piece The Black Hills Belong to the Sioux, Gann adopted a method of switching between different tempos (usually between quarter-notes, dotted eighths, triplet quarters, and other values) as a more performable alternative to the simultaneous layers at contrasting tempos that he had sought earlier under the influence of Charles Ives.[citation needed] Other composers had arrived at a similar technique via other routes, coalescing into a New York style of the 1980s and '90s called Totalism. A common Gann strategy is to set a rhythmic process in motion and use harmony (mostly triadic or seventh-chord-based, whether microtonal or conventional) to inflect the form and focus the listener's attention. Gann's microtonal music proceeds according to Harry Partch's technique of tonality flux, linking chords through tiny (less than a half-step) increments of voice-leading. In 2000, Gann studied jazz harmony with John Esposito, and began using bebop harmony as a basis for his non-microtonal music, even in contexts not reminiscent of jazz.[citation needed] From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Views: 949 PaulHD
Sergei Rachmaninoff - Prelude Opus 23 No.5 in G Minor
 
03:44
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Transcribed by ClassicMan (MuseScore.org) Image: Luigi Premazzi "The Great Agate Hall in the Catherine Palace at Tsarskoye Selo (1859)" Prelude in G minor, Op. 23, No. 5, is a music piece by Sergei Rachmaninoff, completed in 1901. It was included in his Opus 23 set of ten preludes despite having been written two years earlier than the other nine. Rachmaninoff himself premiered the piece in Moscow on February 10, 1903, along with Preludes No. 1 and 2 from Op. 23. The Prelude's taut structure is in ternary form, consisting of an opening "A" section with punctuated sixteenth-note chords (marked Alla marcia), a more lyrical and melancholy "B" section with sweeping arpeggios in the left hand (marked Poco meno mosso), a transition into the original tempo, and a recapitulation of the initial march. The Alla marcia section is in itself in ternary ABA form. Within the first three measures of the Prelude, Rachmaninoff introduces the unifying factors of the piece (notwithstanding the Poco meno mosso section). First, the chordal march of measure one; second, the fragment on the second half of the beat in measure two; third, the fragment on the second half of beat two in measure three. Measures 1-9 expand on the march theme. Following a cadence in the dominant, the section repeats in measures 10-16 with slight alterations and concludes in a G minor perfect cadence. The "B" subsection of the Alla marcia section (measures 17-24) mirors the rhythm of the first measure, presenting a sequence of related chords beginning with E flat. In contrast to the Alla marcia, the "B" section introduces a lyrical chordal melody over an extended arpeggiated figure. Beginning in measure 35, a two-measure phrase is repeated and then serially extended in measures 39-41. A counter melody appears at measure 42 in the middle voice, intensifying the passage. Following the middle section, the Prelude transitions to a recaptulation of the march section by gradual increases in tempo and dynamics. The section uses of chromatically upward moving chords following embellished diminished seventh figures. Finally, the piece ends in a highly original way: a short arpeggiated run to a high G, marked pianissimo. This prelude is one of the most performed and recorded pieces of the op. 23 set.
Views: 195 PaulHD
Moritz Moszkowski - Étude de Virtuosité Op. 72 No.1 in E Major
 
02:23
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes "You Are The Music While The Music Lasts." T. S. Eliot Image: Palace Golestan - Tehraan Moritz (Maurice) Moszkowski (23 August 1854 – 4 March 1925) was a German-Jewish composer, pianist, and teacher of Polish descent on his paternal side. His brother Alexander Moszkowski was a famous writer and satirist in Berlin. Ignacy Paderewski said: "After Chopin, Moszkowski best understands how to write for the piano, and his writing embraces the whole gamut of piano technique." Although less known today, Moszkowski was well respected and popular during the late nineteenth century. He was born in Breslau, Prussia (now the Polish city of Wrocław), into a wealthy Polish-Jewish family whose parents had come to Breslau from Pilica, near Zawiercie, in 1854. He was an ardent Jew at a time when many Jews downplayed their Jewishness.[2] He showed early talent from a very tender age, beginning his musical training at home until 1865, when his family moved to Dresden. There he continued his piano studies at the conservatory. He moved to Berlin in 1869 to continue his studies first at the Julius Stern's Conservatory, where he studied piano with Eduard Franck and composition with Friedrich Kiel, and then at Theodor Kullak's Neue Akademie der Tonkunst, where he studied composition with Richard Wüerst and orchestration with Heinrich Dorn. There he became close friends with the Scharwenka brothers, Xaver and Philipp. In 1871 he accepted Kullak's offer to become a teacher in his academy; as he was also a more than competent violinist, he sometimes played first violin in the orchestra. In 1873 Moszkowski made his first successful appearance as a pianist, and soon began touring the nearby cities in order to gain experience and establish his reputation. Two years later he was already playing his piano concerto on two pianos with Franz Liszt at a matineé before a selected audience invited by Liszt himself.[3][n 2] Retaining his post as a teacher at the Berlin conservatory from 1875,[n 3] he had among his pupils Frank Damrosch, Joaquín Nin, Ernest Schelling, Joaquín Turina, Carl Lachmund, Bernhard Pollack, Ernst Jonas, Wilhelm Sachs, Helene von Schack, Albert Ulrich and Johanna Wenzel. Moszkowski then travelled successfully throughout Europe under the reputation of being an exceptional concert pianist and brilliant composer, having also gained some recognition as a conductor. In 1884 Moszkowski married the younger sister of pianist and composer Cécile Chaminade, Henriette Chaminade, with whom he had a son named Marcel and a daughter named Sylvia.[4] By the mid-1880s, Moszkowski began suffering from a neurological problem in his arm and gradually diminished his recital activity in favor of composing, teaching and conducting.[4] In 1887 he was invited to London where he had the chance to introduce many of his orchestral pieces. There he was awarded honorary membership by the Royal Philharmonic Society. Three years later his wife left him for the poet Ludwig Fulda and a divorce was issued two years later.[4] In 1908, by the age of 54, Moszkowski had already become a recluse as he began to suffer from poor health. His popularity began to fade and his career slowly went into decline. He stopped taking composition pupils because "they wanted to write like artistic madmen such as Scriabin, Schoenberg, Debussy, Satie ...".[4] His last years he spent in poverty for he had sold all his copyrights and invested the whole lot in German, Polish and Russian bonds and securities, which were rendered worthless on the outbreak of the war. Two of his former pupils, Josef Hofmann and Bernhard Pollack came to his aid. Through the intervention of Pollack, who sent new piano arrangements of Moszkowski's opera Boabdil to Peters Publishing House in Leipzig, he collected an extra 10,000 francs camouflaged as royalties besides a gift of 10,000 marks and personal donations of 10,000 marks from Hofmann and 5,000 marks from himself.[4] On 21 December 1924, when he was ill and heavily in debt, his friends and admirers arranged a grand testimonial concert on his behalf at Carnegie Hall, involving 15 grand pianos on stage. Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Percy Grainger, Josef Lhévinne, Elly Ney, Wilhelm Backhaus and Harold Bauer were among the performers, and Frank Damrosch conducted (Paderewski telegrammed his apologies).[n 5] The concert netted US$13,275, with one part transferred to the Paris branch of the National City Bank of New York in order to provide immediate relief from his financial problems, and an annuity purchased at the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, whereby he would receive US$1,250 annually for the rest of his life.[4][n 6] However, Moszkowski's illness lingered and he died from stomach cancer on 4 March of the next year, before the supply of funds could reach him. The money raised went instead to pay his funeral expenses and to his wife and son.
Views: 4353 PaulHD
Angelus Vox
 
02:01
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel Composed by Tino Danielzik Singer: Adey Bell Kontakt Library: Soundiron Voice Of Wind
Views: 1337 PaulHD
Enya - Once You Had Gold
 
02:32
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes
Views: 289 PaulHD
Art Tatum - Improvisation of Jules Massenet's Élégie
 
03:38
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Painting by Stephen Kasun = http://www.rdzfineart.com/artists/stephen-kasun/ One of the greatest improvisers in jazz history, Art Tatum also set the standard for technical dexterity with his classic 1933 recording of "Tea for Two." Nearly blind, Tatum's artistic vision and ability made him an icon of jazz piano, a musician whose impact will be felt for generations to come. Molly Murphy
Views: 710 PaulHD
Bobina & Etasonic - Desire Of My Heart
 
01:34
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel SounEmot = https://soundcloud.com/1994060911 Photo Realistic Oil Painting by Yigal Ozeri Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 1679 PaulHD
Marc-André Hamelin - Tico - Tico no Fubá
 
02:13
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes “(The Piano is) able to communicate the subtlest Universal truths by means of Wood, Metal and Vibrating Air.” Kenneth Miller
Views: 5679 PaulHD
Jasper Broeks - Rainfox
 
01:25
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel This Sample Was Made using Sylenth1 by Lennar Digital Video Editing by PaulHD
Views: 33 PaulHD
Cosmosis - No Such Thing (720p60)
 
07:43
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel “The deepness of your mind produces the thickness of your thoughts.” Michael Bassey Johnson
Views: 46 PaulHD
Art Tatum - Don't Get Around Much Anymore
 
01:11
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes. Software: XLN Audio Addictive Keys
Views: 309 PaulHD
Zac Rae - Shimmer Ballad
 
02:31
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel Enlightenment is when a Wave realizes it is the Ocean.
Views: 2531 PaulHD
Charles-Valentin Alkan - Un Morceau Op. 15 No. 2 "Le Vent"
 
01:53
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Alkan possessed the finest technique he had ever known, but preferred the life of a recluse. - Franz Liszt
Views: 97 PaulHD
Enya - Oriel Window
 
02:26
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes
Views: 2700 PaulHD
A weird Composer - 2 Variations for RSA Theme
 
01:16
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel https://musescore.com/a_weird_composer
Views: 21 PaulHD
Adolf Von Henselt - Étude Caractristique Opus 2 No. 3 in B Minor
 
03:34
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Transcribed by ClassicMan: https://musescore.com/classicman/scores/5066391 Photography: The Wirtz Gardens "A sad soul needs an infinite horizon which can throw all his sorrow into the silence of the eternal emptiness!" Mehmet Murat ildan
Views: 108 PaulHD
Charles-Valentin Alkan - Air de Ballet in D Minor
 
04:33
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Transcribed by Classic King - musescore.com/user/26830520 Photography: Pallazo Farnese Caprarola in the province of Viterbo, Northern Lazio, Italy
Views: 109 PaulHD
Conlon Nancarrow [Arditti Quartet] - Toccata for Violin and Player Piano
 
01:36
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel Conlon Nancarrow (1912 - 1997) composed approximately fifty Studies for player piano, some of the most remarkable music of the 20th century. "My essential concern, whether you can analyze it or not, is emotional; there's an impact that I try to achieve by these means." —Conlon Nancarrow (from “Conlon Nancarrow: Interviews in Mexico City” with Roger Reynolds) "This music is the greatest discovery since Webern and Ives... something great and important for all music history! His music is so utterly original, enjoyable, perfectly constructed but at the same time emotional...for me it's the best of any composer living today." —György Ligeti (in a letter to Charles Amirkhanian) "Conlon's music has such an outrageous, original character that it is literally shocking. It confronts you. Like Emerson said of Thoreau, 'We have a new proposition.'" —John Cage (from On Conlon Nancarrow, Eva Soltes) "His music, almost all written for player piano, is the most rhythmically complex ever written." —Kyle Gann (The Music of Conlon Nancarrow) "It doesn't seem possible that art like that could exist." —Roger Reynolds (from Conlon Nancarrow: Virtuoso of the Player Piano, James Greeson). "The stuff is fantastic... You've got to hear it. It'll kill you." —Frank Zappa (from Musician, with Dan Forte). "Every time Conlon punched a hole, the world got more interesting." —Robert Willey
Views: 61 PaulHD
Charles-Valentin Alkan - Symphony for Solo Piano, 1st Movement Opus 39 No. 4 in C Minor
 
10:53
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Image: Piano in the Manifold Recording Studio Opus 39 No. 4 in C Minor is the first movement in a symphony for solo piano composed by Charles-Valentin Alkan. It was first published in 1857.
Views: 127 PaulHD
Morten Gildberg - A Whole New World
 
02:11
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel https://soundcloud.com/musicbymortengildberg Buildings in Dubai Photographed above the Clouds by Daniel Cheong Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 34 PaulHD
Animantra - The Message (720p60)
 
07:44
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel Animantra = https://soundcloud.com/animantra Animantra is a visionary trance project from Israel. The name is a combination of Latin - Anima and Sanskrit - Mantra.. Simple meaning - The mantra of Consciousness. The project was born in 2010, initially it was a melodic psy-fullon, which evolved into a synergy of goa melodies and fullonic drive with nitzhogoa flavour, speed and breaks. Pavel's classic musical education adds a "classic" spice to the music, and gives it a very special flavor. "We are all in a post-hypnotic trance induced in early infancy." R. D. Laing ription
Views: 1799 PaulHD
Enya - Lothlorien
 
01:20
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Pipe Organ
Views: 500 PaulHD
Jean-Amédée Méreaux - Étude No.12 "Moto Perpetuo"
 
02:14
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Grand Piano
Views: 228 PaulHD
Chopin - Ballade No.1 Opus 23 in G Minor
 
08:55
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Transcribed by ClassicMan (https://musescore.com/classicman) Painting by John Atkinson Grimshaw Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Opus 23, composed in 1831 during the composer's early years in Vienna, was a reflection about his loneliness in the city far away from home, where a war was happening against the Russian Empire's oppression. Once finished, it wasn't published until his move to Paris, where he dedicated it to Baron Nathaniel von Stockhausen, the Hanoverian ambassador to France. Robert Schumann commented that, “I received a new Ballade from Chopin. It seems to be a work closest to his genius (although not the most ingenious) and I told him that I like it best of all his compositions. After quite a lengthy silence he replied with emphasis, 'I am happy to hear this since I too like it most and hold it dearest.'” The piece begins with a brief introduction which, contrary to popular belief, is not unrelated to the rest of the piece. Written in first inversion of the A♭ major chord, it is a Neapolitan chord that implies a majestic aura, ending in a dissonant, questioning left hand chord D, G, and E♭ that is not resolved until later on in the piece. Though Chopin's original manuscript clearly marks an E♭ as the top note, the chord has caused some degree of controversy, and thus, some versions of the work – such as the Klindworth edition – include D, G, D as an ossia. The main section of the Ballade is built from two main themes. The brief introduction fades into the first theme, introduced at measure 8. After some elaboration, the second theme is introduced softly at measure 68. This theme is also elaborated on. Both themes then return in different keys, and the first theme finally returns again in the same key, albeit with an altered left hand accompaniment. A thundering chord introduces the coda, marked Presto con fuoco, to which the initial Neapolitan harmony re-emerges in constant dynamic forward propulsion, which eventually ends the piece in a fiery double octave scale run down the keyboard. As a whole, the piece is structurally complex and not strictly confined to any particular form, but incorporates ideas from mainly the sonata and variation forms. A distinguishing feature of Ballade No. 1 is its time signature. While the other three are written in strict compound duple time with a 6/8 time signature, Ballade No. 1 bears deviations from this. The introduction is written in 4/4 time, and the more extensive Presto con fuoco coda is written in 2/2. The rest of the piece is written in 6/4, rather than the 6/8 which characterizes the others.
Views: 199 PaulHD
Enya - Lothlorien
 
02:25
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel Remix by Joachim Olsen Painting by Carlos Schwabe Sotheb Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 1792 PaulHD
Joe Satriani - Baroque (Organ Version)
 
02:38
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Pipe Organ
Views: 486 PaulHD
Morten Lauridsen - O Nata Lux
 
04:28
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel https://soundcloud.com/shanahanmusic/o-nata-lux-morten-lauridsen Photography by Kirsty Mitchell "Empty Kingdom" Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 54 PaulHD
Schrödinger's Cat - Piano Rag by Pribelszky Máté
 
02:02
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Grand Piano Steinway and Sons model D
Views: 387 PaulHD
Mily Balakirev - Islamey "An Oriental Fantasy For Piano"
 
07:54
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Artwork by Jean-François Rauzier
Views: 68 PaulHD
Hexaméron, Morceau de Concert, S. 392 Variations IV,  V
 
03:18
Experimental Remix, Non-Commercial Purposes Variation IV: Legato e grazioso (Henri Herz) Variation V: Vivo e brillante (Carl Czerny) - Fuocoso molto energico; Lento quasi recitativo (Franz Liszt) Transcribed by ClassicMan Photograph by Massimo Listri - La reggia di Venaria Reale
Views: 68 PaulHD
Atmospherics
 
01:25
Non-Commercial Purposes, Monetization Is Disabled For My Channel Artwork by A. Andrew Gonzalez Music by Louis Couka = https://soundcloud.com/user-543586619 Synth VST by UVI Falcon Video editing by PaulHD
Views: 2203 PaulHD
Jean-Amédée Méreaux - Étude No.33
 
02:49
Experimental remix, non-commercial purposes. Software: Toontrack EZkeys Grand Piano
Views: 256 PaulHD