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PLS-2: My First PL/SQL Program
 
11:34
For Full Course Experience Please Go To http://mentorsnet.org/course_preview?course_id=5 Full Course Experience Includes 1. Access to course videos and exercises 2. View & manage your progress/pace 3. In-class projects and code reviews 4. Personal guidance from your Mentors Goal is to write your first PL/SQL program. The basic program unit in PL/SQL is the block. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords partition the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. Example of a Block DECLARE bonus NUMBER(8,2); emp_id NUMBER(6) := 100; BEGIN SELECT salary * 0.10 INTO bonus FROM employees WHERE employee_id = emp_id; Exception When NO_DATA_FOUND THEN null ; END; This is a typical PL/SQL block where 10% of salary is selected and stored on a temp variables bonus. If for some reason there is no employee with empid = 100 then the control will come to exception area and the code in the exception area will be executed. These blocks can be entirely separate or nested one within another. The basic units (procedures and functions, also known as subprograms, and anonymous blocks) that make up a PL/SQL program are logical blocks, which can contain any number of nested sub blocks. Therefore, one block can represent a small part of another block, which in turn can be part of the whole unit of code. Anonymous Blocks Anonymous blocks are unnamed blocks. They are declared at the point in an application where they are to be executed and are passed to the PL/SQL engine for execution at run time. You can embed an anonymous block within a pre-compiler program and within iSQL*Plus or Server Manager. Triggers in Oracle Developer components consist of such blocks. Subprograms Subprograms are named PL/SQL blocks that can accept parameters and can be invoked. You can declare them either as procedures or as functions. Generally use a procedure to perform an action and a function to compute a value. You can store subprograms at the server or application level. Using Oracle Developer components (Forms, Reports, and Graphics), you can declare procedures and functions as part of the application (a form or report) and call them from other procedures, functions, and triggers (see next page) within the same application whenever necessary. Note: A function is similar to a procedure, except that a function must return a value.
Views: 66227 Oresoft LWC
Learning PL/SQL programming
 
29:21
Download the session ppts @ https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_2D199JLIIpLXp5cm9QMFpVS00/view?usp=sharing 3:05 - Procedures 6:48 - Cursors 15:13 - Functions 16:36 - Triggers 21:35 - Package 23:59 - Exceptions
Views: 162432 BBarters
Stored Procedure Programming Concepts  -  Begin End Code Blocks
 
01:36
Stored Procedures Unpacked: https://www.udemy.com/stored-procedures-unpacked-learn-to-code-t-sql-stored-procs/?couponCode=YOUTUBE-VDESC-V1. Access the FULL course and downloadable PSDs/practice code/supplemental materials now.” In SQL, we use BEGIN END Code Blocks to define a statement block, which is really a series of SQL statements that run together. Sometimes a statement block is also called a batch. The usage will become more apparent when we start talking about If...Else, but consider this. For now, if a statement's a sentence, think about the Begin and End as the ability to define paragraphs. They allow us to define groupings of statements that would make sense to run together. For instance, here you'll see an example of some statements where we are declaring two variables that we are then printing. We are declaring A as 10 and B as 20. Then we're adding them together. And they're within a Code Block. There's a beginning the block with a BEGIN, and there's the end of the block with an END. These statements will run in sequence starting at the beginning of the BEGIN block all the way to the end. To promote readability, it's best practice to indent the code within the block. Again, these blocks later on are used to help build other constructs, like If...then, as well as While loops. That's where we're really going to start seeing them shine because with those types of statements they will need to use the block to understand what statements are run within them. That's where we'll start to see blocks in IF THEN blocks. I'll see you in the next session, and we will start to use BEGIN ENDS then.
Views: 77 Kris Wenzel
SQL: WITH Clause
 
06:11
In this tutorial, you'll learn will learn how to use with clause PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 15562 radhikaravikumar
78/125 Oracle PLSQL: Design consideration  / NOCOPY Hint 2
 
15:40
Learn Oracle PLSQL EXAM 1Z0-144 ------------------------------------------------------ create or replace package nocopy_test is type number_t is table of varchar2(32767) index by binary_integer; procedure pass_by_vale(nums in out number_t); procedure pass_by_refernce(nums in out nocopy number_t); procedure init; end; ------------------------------------------------------------------------- create or replace package body nocopy_test is l_numbers number_t; c_array_size number:=1000000; c_it number:=20; procedure pass_by_vale(nums in out number_t) is indx pls_integer; begin indx:=nums.count; end; procedure pass_by_refernce(nums in out nocopy number_t) is indx pls_integer; begin indx:=nums.count; end; procedure init is begin l_numbers.delete; for i in 1..c_array_size loop l_numbers(i):='s'||i; end loop; dbms_output.put_line('start '||to_char(sysdate,'hh:mi:ss') ); for i in 1..1000 loop pass_by_vale(l_numbers); end loop; dbms_output.put_line('end '||to_char(sysdate,'hh:mi:ss') ); dbms_output.put_line('start '||to_char(sysdate,'hh:mi:ss')); for i in 1..1000 loop pass_by_refernce(l_numbers); end loop; dbms_output.put_line('end '||to_char(sysdate,'hh:mi:ss')); end; end; ----------------------------------------- begin nocopy_test.init; end;
Views: 512 khaled alkhudari
SQL: LEAD Function
 
06:30
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to make use of lead function in oracle sql PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 2243 radhikaravikumar
SQL Prompt Tips - Begin End Highlighting
 
01:09
See how SQL Prompt v6.4 and later highlight your code.
Views: 619 Steve Jones
MySQL Stored Procedure 10 - CREATE PROCEDURE
 
05:27
Stored procedures are a vast topic in relational Databases. This video will introduce you to creating your very first stored routine. We discuss delimiters, the create procedure command, the begin and end command, and we briefly introduce the idea of parameters. Hopefully this video is helpful! SQL Fiddle at beginning: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!9/982120 SQL Fiddle at end: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!9/de5378/1 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me!: http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 19388 Caleb Curry
Oracle SQL Tutorial : pl sql create job in Oracle Scheduler
 
08:09
Oracle SQL Tutorial Job In Oracle : How to Create and Run Job in Oracle Scheduler This video will show you how to Scheduling Jobs with Oracle Scheduler. pl sql create job dbms job scheduler example DBMS_SCHEDULER ---------------------- A job object (job) is a collection of metadata that describes a user-defined task that is scheduled to run one or more times. It is a combination of what needs to be executed (the action) and when (the schedule). CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE myproc AS BEGIN INSERT INTO MYTEST(CREATED_ON) VALUES (sysdate); commit; END myproc; / BEGIN DBMS_SCHEDULER.CREATE_JOB ( job_name = ‘My_job’, job_type = ‘STORED_PROCEDURE’, job_action = ‘MYPROC’, start_date = ’07-AUG-16 07.00.00 PM’, repeat_interval = ‘FREQ=SECONDLY;INTERVAL=5', end_date =’20-NOV-18 07.00.00 PM’, auto_drop = FALSE, comments = ‘My new job’); END; / EXEC DBMS_SCHEDULER.ENABLE(‘My_job’); Subscribe on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpiyAesWNYOXSz5GPq8lbkA For more tutorial please visit #techquerypond https://techquerypond.com https://techquerypond.wordpress.com https://twitter.com/techquerypond oracle job scheduler
Views: 19728 Tech Query Pond
SQL: Transaction Part-1
 
06:05
In this tutorial, you'll learn what are transaction and nature of transaction. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 3554 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Object Type
 
08:31
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is a object type in sql/plsql PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 14035 radhikaravikumar
SQL Prompt Tips - #7 Begin end highlight
 
01:12
In this short video, SQLServerCentral editor Steve Jones shows us some tips and tricks for SQL Prompt that you may not know. Video #7 is about begin and end highlighting. Visit http://www.red-gate.com/products/sql-development/sql-prompt/ for more info about SQL Prompt.
Views: 3762 Redgate Videos
PL/SQL: Mutating Triggers Part-1
 
06:24
In this tutorial, you'll learn... PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 25047 radhikaravikumar
Oracle tutorial : sys_refcursor  in oracle pl sql (sys_refcursor)
 
09:53
Oracle tutorial : sys_refcursor in oracle pl sql oracle tutorial for beginners cursor in pl sql we can use sys_refcursor as OUT parameter. A cursor is a pointer to a result set for a query. By returning a sys_refcursor you allow the client to fetch many rows from the query as it requires. basically we use sys ref cursor to return set of rows to client. so client can use this result set. u can fetch multiple rows. lets see example.. CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE get_my_list (list OUT SYS_REFCURSOR) AS BEGIN OPEN list FOR SELECT ALTID, FNAME, LNAME FROM EMPLOYEE; END get_my_list; / DECLARE l_cursor SYS_REFCURSOR; ID VARCHAR2(20); FNAME VARCHAR2(20); LNAME VARCHAR2(20); BEGIN get_my_list (list = l_cursor); LOOP FETCH l_cursor INTO ID, FNAME, LNAME; EXIT WHEN l_cursor%NOTFOUND; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(ID || ' | ' || FNAME || ' | ' || LNAME); END LOOP; CLOSE l_cursor; END; / Subscribe on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpiyAesWNYOXSz5GPq8lbkA For more tutorial please visit #techquerypond https://techquerypond.wordpress.com https://twitter.com/techquerypond database cursor example database cursor sql server cursor
Views: 2209 Tech Query Pond
PL/SQL: Collections Part-1
 
06:13
In this tutorial, you'll learn the introduction to collections. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 15354 radhikaravikumar
PART-1 (Hello World)  Oracle PL SQL Training - Fast Track Series
 
10:02
Topic 1: Basic Syntax, Hello World Program And Program Units Basic Syntax: Declaration Executable Commands (Begin End) Exception Handling set serveroutput on; begin dbms_output.put_line('Hello World'); end; / DECLARE RADIOUS NUMBER := 7; PI NUMBER := 3.14; AREA NUMBER ; BEGIN AREA := PI * RADIOUS * RADIOUS ; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('AREA :' || AREA); END; / DECLARE A NUMBER := 0; B NUMBER := 5; C NUMBER; BEGIN C := B/A; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('C :' || C); END; / DECLARE A NUMBER := 0; B NUMBER := 5; C NUMBER; BEGIN C := B/A; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('C :' || C); EXCEPTION WHEN ZERO_DIVIDE THEN DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('NUMBER CAN NOT BE DIVIDED BY ZERO'); END; / Program Units: • Anonymous Blocks • Functions • Procedures • Package and Package Body • Trigger • Type and Type Body
Views: 2647 Sanket Patel
Dynamic SQL in Stored Procedure
 
09:32
In this video we will discuss, using dynamic sql in a stored procedure and it's implications from sql injection perspective. We will discuss performance implications of using dynamic sql in a stored procedure in a later video. Text version of the video http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2017/04/dynamic-sql-in-stored-procedure.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2017/04/dynamic-sql-in-stored-procedure_11.html All SQL Server Text Articles http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/free-sql-server-video-tutorials-for.html All SQL Server Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/sql-server.html All SQL Server Tutorial Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL08903FB7ACA1C2FB All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists Consider the following stored procedure "spSearchEmployees". We implemented this procedure in Part 139 of SQL Server tutorial. This stored procedure does not have any dynamic sql in it. It is all static sql and is immune to sql injection. Create Procedure spSearchEmployees @FirstName nvarchar(100) = NULL, @LastName nvarchar(100) = NULL, @Gender nvarchar(50) = NULL, @Salary int = NULL As Begin Select * from Employees where (FirstName = @FirstName OR @FirstName IS NULL) AND (LastName = @LastName OR @LastName IS NULL) AND (Gender = @Gender OR @Gender IS NULL) AND (Salary = @Salary OR @Salary IS NULL) End Go Whether you are creating your dynamic sql queries in a client application like ASP.NET web application or in a stored procedure, you should never ever concatenate user input values. Instead you should be using parameters. Notice in the following example, we are creating dynamic sql queries by concatenating parameter values, instead of using parameterized queries. This stored procedure is prone to SQL injection. Let's prove this by creating a "Search Page" that calls this procedure. Create Procedure spSearchEmployeesBadDynamicSQL @FirstName nvarchar(100) = NULL, @LastName nvarchar(100) = NULL, @Gender nvarchar(50) = NULL, @Salary int = NULL As Begin Declare @sql nvarchar(max) Set @sql = 'Select * from Employees where 1 = 1' if(@FirstName is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and FirstName=''' + @FirstName + '''' if(@LastName is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and LastName=''' + @LastName + '''' if(@Gender is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and Gender=''' + @Gender + '''' if(@Salary is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and Salary=''' + @Salary + '''' Execute sp_executesql @sql End Go Add a Web Page to the project that we have been working with in our previous video. Name it "DynamicSQLInStoredProcedure.aspx". Copy and paste the HTML and code available on my blog at the following link http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2017/04/dynamic-sql-in-stored-procedure.html At this point, run the application and type the following text in the "Firsname" text and click "Search" button. Notice "SalesDB" database is dropped. Our application is prone to SQL injection as we have implemented dynamic sql in our stored procedure by concatenating strings instead of using parameters. ' Drop database SalesDB -- In the following stored procedure we have implemented dynamic sql by using parameters, so this is not prone to sql injecttion. This is an example for good dynamic sql implementation. Create Procedure spSearchEmployeesGoodDynamicSQL @FirstName nvarchar(100) = NULL, @LastName nvarchar(100) = NULL, @Gender nvarchar(50) = NULL, @Salary int = NULL As Begin Declare @sql nvarchar(max) Declare @sqlParams nvarchar(max) Set @sql = 'Select * from Employees where 1 = 1' if(@FirstName is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and [email protected]' if(@LastName is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and [email protected]' if(@Gender is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and [email protected]' if(@Salary is not null) Set @sql = @sql + ' and [email protected]' Execute sp_executesql @sql, N'@FN nvarchar(50), @LN nvarchar(50), @Gen nvarchar(50), @sal int', @[email protected], @[email protected], @[email protected], @[email protected] End Go On the code-behind page, use stored procedure spSearchEmployeesGoodDynamicSQL instead of spSearchEmployeesBadDynamicSQL. We do not have to change any other code. At this point run the application one more time and type the following text in the "Firstname" textbox and click the "Search" button. ' Drop database SalesDB -- Notice "SalesDB" database is not dropped, So in this case our application is not succeptible to SQL injection attack. Summary : Whether you are creating dynamic sql in a client application (like a web application) or in a stored procedure always use parameters instead of concatnating strings. Using parameters to create dynamic sql statements prevents sql injection.
Views: 36806 kudvenkat
56/125 Oracle PLSQL: Working with Packages / Forward Declaration
 
11:59
Learn Oracle PLSQL EXAM 1Z0-144 --------------------------------------------------------------------- create or replace package proc_rules_calling is procedure print_emp_details (p_emp_id number); end; create or replace package body proc_rules_calling is function get_no_work_days (p_emp_id number) return number is v_hiredate date; begin select HIRE_DATE into v_hiredate from employees where EMPLOYEE_ID=p_emp_id; return round(sysdate-v_hiredate); end; procedure print_emp_details (p_emp_id number) is -- we will call the funcion from this procedure --so it should be defined above in order to invoke it v_details employees%rowtype; begin select * into v_details from employees where EMPLOYEE_ID=p_emp_id; dbms_output.put_line( 'id:'||v_details.EMPLOYEE_ID); dbms_output.put_line( 'fname:'||v_details.FIRST_NAME); dbms_output.put_line( 'salary:'||v_details.salary); dbms_output.put_line( 'hire date:'||v_details.HIRE_DATE); dbms_output.put_line( 'no of days work:'||get_no_work_days(p_emp_id)); end; end; execute proc_rules_calling.print_emp_details(101); ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ --same example but we will change the order create or replace package proc_rules_calling is procedure print_emp_details (p_emp_id number); end; --it will give error --'GET_NO_WORK_DAYS' not declared in this scope create or replace package body proc_rules_calling is procedure print_emp_details (p_emp_id number) is v_details employees%rowtype; begin select * into v_details from employees where EMPLOYEE_ID=p_emp_id; dbms_output.put_line( 'id:'||v_details.EMPLOYEE_ID); dbms_output.put_line( 'fname:'||v_details.FIRST_NAME); dbms_output.put_line( 'salary:'||v_details.salary); dbms_output.put_line( 'hire date:'||v_details.HIRE_DATE); dbms_output.put_line( 'no of days work:'||get_no_work_days(p_emp_id)); end; function get_no_work_days (p_emp_id number) return number is v_hiredate date; begin select HIRE_DATE into v_hiredate from employees where EMPLOYEE_ID=p_emp_id; return round(sysdate-v_hiredate); end; end; ------------------------------------------------------------------ --the solution is to do forward declaration drop package proc_rules_calling; create or replace package proc_rules_calling is procedure print_emp_details (p_emp_id number); end; create or replace package body proc_rules_calling is function get_no_work_days (p_emp_id number) return number; -- we put the function specification only procedure print_emp_details (p_emp_id number) is -- we will call the funcion from this procedure --so it should be defined above in order to invoke it v_details employees%rowtype; begin select * into v_details from employees where EMPLOYEE_ID=p_emp_id; dbms_output.put_line( 'id:'||v_details.EMPLOYEE_ID); dbms_output.put_line( 'fname:'||v_details.FIRST_NAME); dbms_output.put_line( 'salary:'||v_details.salary); dbms_output.put_line( 'hire date:'||v_details.HIRE_DATE); dbms_output.put_line( 'no of days work:'||get_no_work_days(p_emp_id)); end; function get_no_work_days (p_emp_id number) return number is v_hiredate date; begin select HIRE_DATE into v_hiredate from employees where EMPLOYEE_ID=p_emp_id; return round(sysdate-v_hiredate); end; end; execute proc_rules_calling.print_emp_details(104);
Views: 919 khaled alkhudari
11-Oracle PL-SQL Arabic Course   Explicit Cursors اوراكل ديفلوبر
 
15:45
أهلا بكم فى درس جديد من سلسلة دروس أوراكل ديفلوبر شرح SQL فى درس اليوم نجيب على السؤال ماهو الكيرسور(CURSOR)؟ كما نتحدث عن الفرق بين: Implicit cursor – Explicit cursor وكذلك خطوات انشاء Explicit cursor و هى: Declare cursor – Open cursor – fetch cursor - close cursor. كما نتناول بالشرح : Explicit cursor attributes: %isopen %found %notfound %rowcount SYNTAX: CURSOR cursor_name IS select_statement; DECLARE CURSOR c_emp_cursor IS SELECT employee_id, last_name FROM employees WHERE department_id =30; v_emp_record c_emp_cursor%ROWTYPE; BEGIN OPEN c_emp_cursor; LOOP FETCH c_emp_cursor INTO v_emp_record; EXIT WHEN c_emp_cursor%NOTFOUND; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE( v_emp_record.employee_id ||' '||v_emp_record.last_name); END LOOP; CLOSE c_emp_cursor; END; ......................................­.................... تواصل معانا علي الفيس بوك من هنا : https://www.facebook.com/askgad .......................................­.................... تواصل معانا علي موقعنا من هنا : https://www.askgad.com
Views: 5479 Ask Gad
How To Use Explicit Cursor On Oracle PL/SQL
 
08:01
Main Components of Oracle PL/SQL are: BEGIN DECLARE END; / One of feature of Oracle PL/SQL is Cursor. There are two type of Cursor available, which are Implicit Cursor and Explicit Cursor. Implicit Cursor will only processing one record, meanwhile Explicit Cursor will process 1 or more records of data. To use Explicit Cursor we can use the 2+6 formula. 2 for two statements on declaration and 6 for six statements on the content (Begin-End). Please Subscribe
Views: 156 Boby Siswanto
Oracle tutorial : User Defined Exception in Oracle PL SQL
 
05:59
Oracle tutorial: User Defined Exception in Oracle PL SQL pl sql exception handling pl sql exception handling examples This video will show you how to raise user defined exceptions in oracle. Example: BEGIN IF condition THEN RAISE exception_name; END IF; EXCEPTION WHEN exception_name THEN statement; END; 1)We can defined exception to make your own exception. 2)This exception must be declare yourself and RAISE statement to raise explicitly. Declare exception : user_define_exception_name EXCEPTION; RAISE exception : RAISE user_define_exception_name; How to use : WHEN user_define_exception_name THEN //User Action lets see an example DECLARE exception1 EXCEPTION; g NUMBER; BEGIN FOR g IN (SELECT * FROM EMPLOYEE) LOOP IF g.ID = 7 THEN RAISE exception1; END IF; END LOOP; EXCEPTION WHEN exception1 THEN dbms_output.put_line(‘WE HAVE FOUND EMPLOYEE NUMBER 7’); END; / Subscribe on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpiyAesWNYOXSz5GPq8lbkA For more tutorial please visit #techquerypond https://techquerypond.com https://techquerypond.wordpress.com https://twitter.com/techquerypond
Views: 208 Tech Query Pond
Stored procedures in sql server   Part 18
 
20:11
In this video we will learn 1. What is a stored procedure 2. Stored Procedure example 3. Creating a stored procedure with parameters 4. Altering SP 5. Viewing the text of the SP 6. Dropping the SP 7. Encrypting stored procedure Text version of the video http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2012/08/stored-procedures-part-18.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2013/08/part-18-stored-procedures.html All SQL Server Text Articles http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/free-sql-server-video-tutorials-for.html All SQL Server Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/sql-server.html All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists
Views: 774414 kudvenkat
SQL: Delete Vs Truncate Vs Drop
 
08:27
In this tutorial, you'll learn the difference between delete/drop and truncate. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 71277 radhikaravikumar
Oracle tutorial : Exception Handling In Oracle PL SQL
 
13:21
Oracle tutorial : Exception Handling In Oracle PL SQL pl sql exception no data found pl sql select no data found oracle trigger exception pl sql exception handling best practice CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE ORA_EXCE_HANDLING IS MYQUERY VARCHAR2(100); STR_ID VARCHAR2(10); BEGIN MYQUERY:='SELECT ID FROM MYDEV.EMPLOYEE111 WHERE ID=''1'''; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('QUERY '||MYQUERY); BEGIN EXECUTE IMMEDIATE MYQUERY INTO STR_ID; EXCEPTION WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('EXCEPTION CAPTURE.'); WHEN OTHERS THEN DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('OTHER EXCEPTION IS CAPTURE HERE :'||SQLERRM); END; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('EMPLOYEE ID '||STR_ID); END; #techquerypond https://techquerypond.wordpress.com https://techquerypond.com https://twitter.com/techquerypond
Views: 949 Tech Query Pond
PL/SQL: Brief on Nested tables
 
04:00
In this tutorial, you'll learns the points to be noted on Nested tables PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 5540 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Brief on V-arrays
 
03:35
In this tutorial, you'll learn the points to be noted on V-arrays PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 4058 radhikaravikumar
Sql query to select all names that start with a given letter without like operator
 
03:02
Text Article http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2017/01/sql-query-to-select-all-names-that.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2017/01/sql-query-to-select-all-names-that_31.html SQL Server Interview Questions and Answers text articles & slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2014/05/sql-server-interview-questions-and.html SQL Server Interview Questions and Answers playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6n9fhu94yhXcztdLO7i6mdyaegC8CJwR All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists In this video we will discuss writing a SQL query to retrieve all student names that start with letter 'M' without using the LIKE operator. If the interviewer has not mentioned not to use LIKE operator, we would have written the query using the LIKE operator as shown below. SELECT * FROM Students WHERE Name LIKE 'M%' We can use any one of the following 3 SQL Server functions, to achieve exactly the same thing. CHARINDEX LEFT SUBSTRING The following 3 queries retrieve all student rows whose Name starts with letter 'M'. Notice none of the queries are using the LIKE operator. SELECT * FROM Students WHERE CHARINDEX('M',Name) = 1 SELECT * FROM Students WHERE LEFT(Name, 1) = 'M' SELECT * FROM Students WHERE SUBSTRING(Name, 1, 1) = 'M'
Views: 66405 kudvenkat
PL/SQL: Without using Length function
 
06:22
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to get the length of a string PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 2209 radhikaravikumar
81/125 Oracle PLSQL: Design consideration  / Bulk Binding 2
 
14:03
Learn Oracle PLSQL EXAM 1Z0-144 Bulk Binding Bulk collect begin dbms_output.put_line(sqlerrm (-12899)); end; ------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------- drop table ename; create table ename as select distinct first_name from employees; select first_name from ename; declare type ename_t is table of varchar2(100); ename_table ename_t:=ename_t(); c number:=0; errors number; begin for i in (select * from ename ) loop c:=c+1; ename_table.extend; ename_table(c):=i.first_name; end loop; forall i in ename_table.first.. ename_table.last save exceptions update ename set first_name=first_name||' to be added:)' --14 char where first_name=ename_table(i); exception when others then errors := sql%bulk_exceptions.count; dbms_output.put_line ('The total number of errors occured are '|| errors); for j in 1..errors loop dbms_output.put_line ('The error iteration is ' || sql%bulk_exceptions(j).error_index || ' and the error code is ' || sql%bulk_exceptions(j).error_code || ' and the error message is ' || sqlerrm ( -sql%bulk_exceptions(j).error_code) ); end loop; end; select * from ename ----------------------------- drop table ename; create table ename as select distinct first_name from employees; select first_name from ename; declare type ename_t is table of varchar2(100); ename_table ename_t:=ename_t(); c number:=0; errors number; begin /* for i in (select * from ename ) loop c:=c+1; ename_table.extend; ename_table(c):=i.first_name; end loop; */ select first_name bulk collect into ename_table from ename; forall i in ename_table.first.. ename_table.last save exceptions update ename set first_name=first_name||' to be added:)' --14 char where first_name=ename_table(i); exception when others then errors := sql%bulk_exceptions.count; dbms_output.put_line ('The total number of errors occured are '|| errors); for j in 1..errors loop dbms_output.put_line ('The error iteration is ' || sql%bulk_exceptions(j).error_index || ' and the error code is ' || sql%bulk_exceptions(j).error_code || ' and the error message is ' || sqlerrm ( -sql%bulk_exceptions(j).error_code) ); end loop; end; select * from ename
Views: 556 khaled alkhudari
SQL: Union Vs UnionAll
 
04:37
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is union & unionall PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 2188 radhikaravikumar
SQL: TRIM function
 
06:35
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to use trim function PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 3098 radhikaravikumar
1-.Programacion PL/SQL Orientada a Objetos - Arrays
 
10:35
create or replace type ListaTipoArray as array(5) of varchar2(100); / create or replace type ListaNumTipoArray as array(5) of number(1); / declare --datos nombre1 varchar2(10):= 'Mario'; apellido1 varchar2(10):= 'ruiz'; apellido2 varchar2(10):= 'gonzalez'; pais varchar2(10):= 'Mexico'; Ciudad varchar2(10):= 'CDMX'; --declarar variable tipo array DatosPersonales ListaTipoArray; --declarar variable tipo array NumeroDato ListaNumTipoArray; begin --se abren instancias DatosPersonales:= ListaTipoArray(nombre1, apellido1, apellido2, pais, Ciudad); NumeroDato:= ListaNumTipoArray(1, 2, 3, 4, 5); for i in 1 .. 5 loop dbms_output.put_line(NumeroDato(i)||'.'|| DatosPersonales(i)||chr(13)); end loop; exception when others then dbms_output.put_line(sqlerrm); end; POO Programacion PL/SQL Orientada a Objetos oracle oracle sql oracle pl sql oracle sqlplus curso curso de oracle curso de sql curso de pl sql curso de sqlplus sql developer toad pl / sql developer desarrollo de aplicaciones programador desarrollador como ser programador como ser desarrollador certificacion certificacion oracle certificaciones 1z0-061 1z0-062 dba dba oracle administrador de base de datos administrador de base de datos oracle database oracle preparar certificacion oracle oracle expert oracle experto oramex el mundo de oracle mario ruiz mario ruiz marioruizcommx buenas practicas como usar pl sql como usar oracle como usar toad como usar sqlplus preguntas de la certificacion braindumps oracle linux linux batch awk perl shell scripting shell
Views: 937 Mario Ruiz
PL/SQL: Coalesce Function
 
04:36
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to make use of coalesce function in oracle SQL. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 3245 radhikaravikumar
Part-3 (Oracle Procedures) Oracle PL SQL Training - Fast Track Series
 
18:26
Oracle Procedures Is a group of PL SQL statement that can call by name. Syntax CREATE [OR REPLACE] PROCEDURE procedure_name [ (parameter [,parameter]) ] IS | AS [declaration_section] BEGIN executable_section [EXCEPTION exception_section] END [procedure_name]; Example:1 of procedure having Only parameter procedure. create or replace procedure insert_employee ( p_emp_name varchar2, p_deptno IN number ) is begin Insert into emp (id,name,deptno) values (emp_id_seq.nextval, p_emp_name, p_deptno); commit; end insert_employee; / Prerequisite for the Example:1 1. Need create emp table create table emp( id number, name varchar2(200), deptno number ); 2. Create sequence object. create sequence emp_id_seq start with 1 Increment by 1 nomaxvalue nocycle; How to call procedure created in Example:1 exec insert_employee('sanket',10); Or begin insert_employee('sanket',10); end; set pagesize 100 set linesize 100 column id format 999 column name format a6 column deptno format 999 select * from emp; ID NAME DEPTNO ---- ------ ------ 1 sanket 10 Example:2 of procedure having In/Out parameter procedure create or replace procedure insert_employee ( p_emp_name varchar2, p_deptno IN number, p_message OUT varchar2 ) is begin Insert into emp (id,name,deptno) values (emp_id_seq.nextval, p_emp_name, p_deptno); commit; p_message:= 'one row inserted...'; end insert_employee; / How to call procedure created in Example:2 set serveroutput on; declare v_message varchar2(100); begin insert_employee(‘',20,v_message); dbms_output.put_line(v_message); end; select * from emp; ID NAME DEPTNO ---- ------ ------ 1 sanket 10
Views: 1575 Sanket Patel
SQL: Lag
 
04:40
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to make use of lag function in oracle sql PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 2387 radhikaravikumar
SQL: ACID (Transaction properties)
 
06:34
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is ACID PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 3241 radhikaravikumar
Oracle Core, Лекция 5
 
53:46
Ссылка на файл с презентацией: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1xANFkC3tkFdby_HIFEEwtqInJqKlgx4ykiIbarK1EPE/edit?usp=sharing (презентация может быть с анимацией) Ссылка на краткий конспект лекции: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1x80R-XlWBI_zFzNN2JMmby2wIvBb7jnfshn9axNXEKs/edit?usp=sharing 1. Общие сведения, история возникновения PL/SQL 2. Среда исполнения 3. Структура PL/SQL блока (declare, begin, exception, end). Именованные/неименованные (анонимные) блоки pl/sql. Вложенные блоки pl/sql 4. Набор разрешенных символов. Требования к именованию идентификаторов. Представление v$reserved_words 5. Арифметические операторы. Логические операторы отношения. 6. Комментарии и метки 7. Основные типы и структуры данных (скалярный, составной, ссылка, lob) 8. Значение null 9. Числовые типы: Number, Number(n), Number(n, m), Pls_Integer/Binary_Integer, Binary_Float, Binary_Double, Natural, Naturaln, Positive, Positiven, Signtype, Simple_Integer, Simple_Float, Simple_Double) 10. Строковые типы: Char, Varchar2, NChar, NVarchar2, Raw, Long, Long Raw 11. Rowid и Urowid 12. Операции со строками. Взаимодействие строк со значением Null 13. Типы для моментов и интервалов времени: Date, Timestamp, Interval. Возможные операции 14. Тип Boolean 15. Типы Lob: BFile, BLob, CLob, NCLob 16. Объявление переменных и констант 17. Составные и динамические типы: Record, %RowType, %Type 18. Пользовательские подтипы Subtype 19. Выражения 20. Функции для работы с NULL: Decode, Nvl, Nvl2, Coalesce 21. Преобразование типов явное и неявное. 22. Таблица неявного преобразования типов. 23. Таблица явного преобразования типов 24. Основные управляющие структуры 25. Конструкция IF...THEN..ELSIF...ELSE 26. Конструкция выбора по условию CASE (простой и с поиском) 27. Циклы Loop... end loop, While loop, For loop, цикл по курсору 28. Оператор Goto Oracle Database, БД Oracle, вебинар Oracle, презентация Oracle, урок Oracle, лекция Oracle, обучение Oracle
Oracle tutorial : Object oriented programming in Oracle PL SQL
 
07:51
Oracle tutorial : Object oriented programming in Oracle PL SQL oracle tutorial for beginners This video Oracle tutorial will tell you how to implement object oriented concept in oracle CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE MyInput AS object ( num1 NUMBER, num2 NUMBER ); CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE MyCal AS object ( mynum MyInput, member FUNCTION Plus RETURN NUMBER , member FUNCTION Sub RETURN NUMBER, member FUNCTION Mul RETURN NUMBER, member FUNCTION Div RETURN NUMBER ); / CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE BODY MyCal as member FUNCTION Plus RETURN NUMBER AS result NUMBER ; BEGIN result := mynum.num1 + mynum.num2; RETURN result; END Plus ; member FUNCTION Sub RETURN NUMBER AS result NUMBER; BEGIN result := mynum.num2 - mynum.num1; RETURN result; END Sub; member FUNCTION Mul RETURN NUMBER AS result NUMBER ; BEGIN result := mynum.num1 * mynum.num2; RETURN result; END; member FUNCTION Div RETURN NUMBER AS result NUMBER (10, 3); BEGIN result := mynum.num1 / mynum.num2 ; RETURN result; END; END ; / DECLARE obj1 MyInput := MyInput(50, 100); obj2 MyCal := MyCal(obj1); BEGIN Dbms_Output.Put_Line(obj2.Plus); Dbms_Output.Put_Line(obj2.Sub); Dbms_Output.Put_Line(obj2.Mul); Dbms_Output.Put_Line(obj2.Div); END; #techquerypond https://techquerypond.com https://techquerypond.wordpress.com https://twitter.com/techquerypond object oriented database example
Views: 3947 Tech Query Pond
SQL Server Tutorial 53: Controlling flow keywords using T-SQL
 
09:55
How to use the BEGIN...END block, Use the IF...ELSE block, Use the WHILE loop with BREAK and CONTINUE using T-SQL. For more info, or a copy of any of the scripts used in any of my tutorials, please email me at [email protected]
Views: 952 Johnny Deluca
SQLPLUS: LineSize & PageSize
 
03:49
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to set linesize and pagesize . PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 19463 radhikaravikumar
PL-SQL 5   Cursors
 
07:17
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxYoN5rLDBaRWGRBLWg3RnhXM0E/edit?usp=sharing Course Objectives cursors ---------------------------- Example SET SERVEROUTPUT ON DECLARE vr_zip ZIPCODE%ROWTYPE; BEGIN SELECT * INTO vr_zip FROM zipcode WHERE rownum menor 2; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('City: '||vr_zip.city); DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('State: '||vr_zip.state); DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Zip: '||vr_zip.zip); END; ---------------------------- Example SET SERVEROUTPUT ON DECLARE CURSOR c_zip IS SELECT * FROM zipcode; vr_zip c_zip%ROWTYPE; BEGIN OPEN c_zip; LOOP FETCH c_zip INTO vr_zip; EXIT WHEN c_zip%NOTFOUND; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(vr_zip.zip|| ' '||vr_zip.city||' '||vr_zip.state); END LOOP; CLOSE c_zip; END; ---------------------------- Example DECLARE CURSOR c_group_discount IS SELECT DISTINCT s.course_no FROM section s, enrollment e WHERE s.section_id = e.section_id GROUP BY s.course_no, e.section_id, s.section_id HAVING COUNT(*)mayor=8; BEGIN FOR r_group_discount IN c_group_discount LOOP UPDATE course SET cost = cost * .95 WHERE course_no = r_group_discount.course_no; END LOOP; COMMIT; END; ---------------------------- Example DECLARE CURSOR c_grade( i_student_id IN enrollment.student_id%TYPE, i_section_id IN enrollment.section_id%TYPE) IS SELECT final_grade FROM enrollment WHERE student_id = i_student_id AND section_id = i_section_id; CURSOR c_enrollment IS SELECT e.student_id, e.section_id FROM enrollment e, section s WHERE s.course_no = 135 AND e.section_id = s.section_id; BEGIN FOR r_enroll IN c_enrollment LOOP FOR r_grade IN c_grade(r_enroll.student_id, r_enroll.section_id) LOOP UPDATE enrollment SET final_grade = 90 WHERE student_id = r_enroll.student_id AND section_id = r_enroll.section_id; END LOOP; END LOOP; END;
Views: 564 Fdo Luis
PL/SQL: Stored Procedures Part-1
 
06:19
In this tutorial, you'll learn what are stored procedures PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 16797 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL 1 - PL SQL environment and variables.
 
05:20
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxYoN5rLDBaRSGlZYnI3eHZjQzA/edit?usp=sharing Course objective SQL - PL / SQL: what's the difference? Environment PL / SQL Benefits of PL / SQL Features PL / SQL PL / SQL and then? Example 1 Declare --Optional /* Variables, constants, cursors*/ Begin --Mandatory /* Statements PL/SQL Clauses PL/SQL*/ null; Exception --Optional /*Actions to be performed when an exception is thrown or when an abnormal termination occurred*/ when others then null; End; --Mandatory ----------------------------------- Example 2 set serveroutput on ; BEGIN dbms_output.put_line('Hello World') ; END ; ------------------------------------------------ Example 3 SET SERVEROUTPUT ON DECLARE v_pls_value1 PLS_INTEGER := 0; v_pls_value2 PLS_INTEGER := 1; v_simple_value1 SIMPLE_INTEGER := 0; v_simple_value2 SIMPLE_INTEGER := 1; v_start_time NUMBER; v_end_time NUMBER; BEGIN v_start_time := DBMS_UTILITY.GET_TIME; FOR i in 1..50000000 LOOP v_pls_value1 := v_pls_value1 + v_pls_value2; END LOOP; v_end_time := DBMS_UTILITY.GET_TIME; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE ('Elapsed time for PLS_INTEGER: '|| (v_end_time - v_start_time)); v_start_time := DBMS_UTILITY.GET_TIME; FOR i in 1..50000000 LOOP v_simple_value1 := v_simple_value1 + v_simple_value2; END LOOP; v_end_time := DBMS_UTILITY.GET_TIME; DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE ('Elapsed time for SIMPLE_INTEGER: '|| (v_end_time - v_start_time)); END; ------------------------------------------------ Example 4 DECLARE TYPE client_t IS RECORD ( numero_v NUMBER(4), nom_v CHAR(20), adresse_v CHAR(20) ) ; client1_v client_t ; BEGIN client1_v.numero_v := 2516 ; dbms_output.put_line(client1_v.numero_v); END ;
Views: 1631 Fdo Luis
Transactions in SQL
 
02:06
Follow this tutorial to learn how to use Transactions in SQL and see how we can roll back to previous changes done in database. Don't forget to check out our site http://howtech.tv/ for more free how-to videos! http://youtube.com/ithowtovids - our feed http://www.facebook.com/howtechtv - join us on facebook https://plus.google.com/103440382717658277879 - our group in Google+ A transaction in SQL is basically the process of one or more changes being made in the database. In this tutorial we will learn the three basic controls of transactions in SQL which are COMMIT, ROLLBACK, and SAVEPOINT Step 1- Commit Command The Commit command is used to save the changes made in the database. To see its implementation, start by first beginning the transaction. Before starting any Transaction in SQL, we have to write the Begin Transaction statement. After that, write the actual action which is required, for example delete from the employee table, where the salary is greater than $2500. After that, write the Commit keyword which confirms that the query is logically correct and can be executed. The Query in this case would be: begin trandelete from EMP where SAL 2500 commit Now when we run the query, a message appears below the Query Editor which shows the number of rows that have been affected by our query. Step 2- Effect of Commit Command After that, fetch all the records from the employee table and it can be seen that all the records which have a salary above $2500 have been deleted. Step 3- Save Points Now let's examine the SAVE POINT command. To understand the concept, we will take an example of a departmental table. Start writing the query by beginning a transaction and then entering in the "Save Transaction" command followed by the transaction name. After that, let's delete a record with the Department number as 10 and then again save the transaction. This time, define the save point as point2. With that done, delete another department, and save the transaction, defining it as point3. Actual Query would be like this: begin tran save tran point1 delete from DEPT where DEPTNO=10 save tran point2 delete from DEPT where DEPTNO=20 save tran point3 After executing it, 2 rows would get affected. Step 4- Departments Deleted Now, see the department table to view the changes. For that, let's fetch all the records from the table. It can be seen that department "10" and "20" has been deleted from the table. Step 5- Roll Back If we want to track back to the previous changes, we can use the save points created earlier along with the Rollback transaction command. The rollback transaction allows us to remove all the modifications made to the data, either from the start of the transaction or to a defined save point. For that, we will use the rollback transaction statement and define the save point after that. Over here, let's roll back to point number 2. The Query would be: rollback tran point2 select * from DEPT Once we execute the query, and fetch all the records from the table, it can be seen that the table now contains the data up till point number 2 in the query. And this is how we can use Transactions in SQL.
PL/SQL: Weak Vs Strong RefCursor && Normal cursor Vs RefCursor
 
10:26
In this tutorial, you'll learn Weak Vs Strong Ref Cursor && Normal cursor Vs Ref Cursor... PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 9356 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Ref Cursors
 
09:28
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is ref cursors. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 28182 radhikaravikumar
SQL: Transaction Part-2
 
06:40
In this tutorial, you'll learn what are transaction and nature of transaction. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 1684 radhikaravikumar
Oracle DBA  How to create sql stored procedure Using Sqlplus
 
03:09
Oracle DBA How to create sql stored procedure Using Sqlplus sql create stored procedure sql stored procedure TO Connect Database 1) Open command Prompt. 2) SET ORACLE_SID=DATABASE NAME 3) SQLPLUS USERNAME/[email protected] CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE INSERT_DATA IS SQLSTRING VARCHAR2(1000); BEGIN SQLSTRING:=’INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE_BKP(ID,NAME,CITY,SALARY,DEPT_NO) ‘; SQLSTRING:=SQLSTRING||’ SELECT ID,NAME,CITY,SALARY,DEPT_NO FROM EMPLOYEE’; EXECUTE IMMEDIATE SQLSTRING; EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR(-20001,’An error was encountered – ‘||SQLCODE||’ -ERROR- ‘||SQLERRM); END;
Views: 1217 Tech Query Pond
PL/SQL: Fibonacci series
 
06:51
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to write Fibonacci series code in plsql PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 4622 radhikaravikumar

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